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    Lawsuits: OnlyFans bribed Instagram to put creators on “terrorist blacklist”

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Thursday, 11 August - 19:04 · 1 minute

Lawsuits: OnlyFans bribed Instagram to put creators on “terrorist blacklist”

Enlarge (credit: SOPA Images / Contributor | LightRocket )

Through the pandemic, OnlyFans took over the online adult entertainment world to become a billion-dollar top dog, projected to earn five times more net revenue in 2022 than in 2020. As OnlyFans’ business grew, content creators on rival platforms complained that social media sites like Facebook and Instagram were blocking their content but seemingly didn’t block OnlyFans with the same fervor, creating an unfair advantage. OnlyFans' mounting success amid every other platform's demise seemed to underscore its mysterious edge.

As adult entertainers outside of OnlyFans’ content stream looked for answers to their declining revenue, they realized that Meta had not only allegedly targeted their accounts to be banned for posting supposedly inappropriate content but seemingly also for suspected terrorist activity. The more they dug into why they had been branded as terrorists, the more they suspected that OnlyFans paid Meta to put the mark on their heads—resulting in account bans that went past Facebook and Instagram and spanned popular social media apps across the Internet.

Now, Meta has been hit with multiple class action lawsuits alleging that senior executives at Meta accepted bribes from OnlyFans to shadow-ban competing adult entertainers by placing them on a "terrorist blacklist." Meta claims the suspected scheme is “highly implausible,” and that it's more likely that OnlyFans beat its rivals in the market through successful strategic moves, like partnering with celebrities. However, lawyers representing three adult entertainers suing Meta say the owner of Facebook and Instagram will likely have to hand over documents to prove it.

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    Amid backlash from privacy advocates, Meta expands end-to-end encryption trial

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Thursday, 11 August - 17:46

Meta is ever so slowly expanding its testing of end-to-end encryption

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Meta is ever so slowly expanding its trial of end-to-end encryption in a bid to protect users from snoops and law enforcement.

End-to-end encryption, often abbreviated as E2EE, uses strong cryptography to encrypt messages with a key that is unique to each user. Because the key is in the sole possession of each user, E2EE prevents everyone else—including the app maker, ISP or carrier, and three-letter agencies—from reading a message. Meta first rolled out E2EE in 2016 in its WhatsApp and Messenger apps, with the former providing it by default and the latter offering it as an opt-in feature. The company said it expects to make E2EE the default setting in Messenger by sometime next year. The Instagram messenger, meanwhile, doesn’t offer E2EE at all.

Starting this week, the social media behemoth will begin testing a secure online storage feature for Messenger communication. For now, it’s available only to select users who connect using either an iOS or Android device. Users who are selected will have the option of turning it on.

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    Meta’s flailing Portal repurposed as a wireless portable monitor

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Thursday, 11 August - 16:24

Meta’s flailing Portal repurposed as a wireless portable monitor

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Meta's Portal displays have always felt pretty niche. The 10- to 14-inch screens were heavily marketed as video-calling devices for apps like Facebook Messenger and Zoom. Even with the addition of music apps like Spotify and productivity apps like Microsoft Teams and a calendar, the products struggled to become something that felt necessary in tech-gadget-filled homes.

Rumor has it that Meta is pivoting the Portal from consumers to businesses, but first, the product is getting at least one more chance to prove it can add value to people's homes. On Wednesday, Meta announced that the Portal Plus Gen 2 and Portal Go now support Duet Display, an app that can turn a display into a secondary monitor for Macs and PCs.

The Portal Plus is the same size as some of the best portable monitors , so it makes sense to repurpose it for that function. Because it's built for video image quality, it has a decent resolution for a portable display—2160×1440.

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    Teen’s jailing shows exactly how Facebook will help anti-abortion states

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 9 August - 21:45

Teen’s jailing shows exactly how Facebook will help anti-abortion states

Enlarge (credit: Charles McQuillan / Stringer | Getty Images News )

For the first time since Roe v. Wade was overturned, there's a clear example showing exactly how Facebook will react to law enforcement requests for abortion data without user consent.

Forbes reports that a 17-year-old named Celeste Burgess in Nebraska had her Facebook messages subpoenaed by detective Ben McBride, who suspected that Burgess' reported stillborn birth was a medication abortion. In the officer's affidavit , he explains that he asked that Meta not notify the teen of the request for her Facebook data because she might tamper with or destroy evidence. Court records show that Meta complied with the logic.

Meta did not immediately respond to Ars' request for comment on this case, but previously, Meta has said that "we notify users (including advertisers) about requests for their information before disclosing it unless we are prohibited by law from doing so or in exceptional circumstances, such as where a child is at risk of harm, emergencies, or when notice would be counterproductive."

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Meta agrees to pay $90 million to settle lawsuit over Facebook tracking users' online activity