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    Huge collection of vintage Apple computers goes to auction next week

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Friday, 24 March, 2023 - 17:55

A Macintosh Portable

Enlarge / I mostly recognize this early laptop from its resemblance to a similar-looking computer in the film 2010 . It's up for auction along with hundreds of other old Apple computers. (credit: Julien's Auctions)

If you've been thinking your home or workspace is perhaps deficient when it comes to old Apple hardware, then I have some good news for you. Next week, a massive trove of classic Apple computing history goes under the hammer when the auction house Julien's Auctions auctions off the Hanspeter Luzi collection of more than 500 Apple computers, parts, software, and the occasional bit of ephemera.

Ars reported on the auction in February , but Julien's Auctions has posted the full catalog ahead of the March 30 event, and for Apple nerds of a certain age, there will surely be much to catch your eye.

The earliest computers in the collection are a pair of Commodore PET 2001s; anyone looking for a bargain on an Apple 1 will have to keep waiting, unfortunately.

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    Egad! 7 key British PCs of the 1980s Americans might have missed

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Friday, 24 March, 2023 - 11:00

A modified Sinclair ZX81 advertisement with color added in the background.

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If you grew up in America, the early history of home computers in the UK might not be familiar to you. But Great Britain produced innovative personal computers that were as equally successful and influential as their counterparts from Atari, Commodore, and Radio Shack in the United States.

To gain insight into the 1980s British PC landscape, we consulted veteran British game developer Kevin Edwards , who helped us identify the top seven most significant platforms.

Having worked on over 40 games released between 1983 and 2022, Edwards developed titles such as Wolverine for the NES, Ken Griffy Jr. Baseball for the Super Nintendo, and many games in the Lego Star Wars series. In fact, his first game, Atomic Protector , debuted for the BBC Micro 40 years ago.

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    Apple, Atari, and Commodore, oh my! Explore a deluxe home vintage computer den

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Saturday, 11 March, 2023 - 12:00 · 1 minute

A view of Brian Green's home computer lab, full of vintage treasures.

Enlarge / A view of Brian Green's home computer lab, full of vintage treasures. (credit: Brian Green )

In a world where millions of people carry a 1990s-grade supercomputer in their pockets , it's fun to revisit tech from a time when a 1 megahertz machine on a desktop represented a significant leap forward. Recently, a collector named Brian Green showed off his vintage computer collection on Twitter, and we thought it would be fun to ask him about why and how he set up his at-home computer lab.

By day, Green works as a senior systems engineer based in Arkansas. But in his off hours, "Ice Breaker" (as he's often known online) focuses his passion on a vintage computer collection that he has been building for decades—and a bulletin board system ( BBS ) called "Particles" he has been running since 1992.

Green's interest in computers dates back to 1980, when he first used an Apple II+ at elementary school. "My older sister brought home a printout from a BASIC program she was working on, and I was fascinated that you could tell a computer what to do using something that resembled English," recalls Green. "Once I realized you could code games, I was hooked."

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    Why the floppy disk just won’t die

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 7 March, 2023 - 14:49

Bunch of floppy disks

Enlarge / Photo taken in Florence, Italy (credit: Daniele Ciabatti/EyeEm via Getty )

When Mark Necaise got down to his last four floppy disks at a rodeo in Mississippi in February, he started to worry.

Necaise travels to horse shows around the state, offering custom embroidery on jackets and vests: “All of the winners would get a jacket and we’d put the name of the farm or the name of the horse or whatever on it,” he says.

Five years ago, he paid $18,000 for a second-hand machine, manufactured in 2004 by the Japanese embroidery equipment specialist Tajima. The only way to transfer the designs from his computer to the machine was via floppy disk.

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