close
    • chevron_right

      Chrome turns 15 and is getting a big redesign

      news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Thursday, 7 September - 17:51 · 1 minute

    It's Chrome's 15th birthday, and the browser is getting a big redesign to celebrate, or at least, it's as big of a redesign as you can do on a big, empty window to the Internet. Google's "Material You" design language is finally coming to Chrome stable (after some experiments in the past), and that means lots of rounded corners and pastel colors.

    There has long been a "customize Chrome" button on the new tab page, but now when you open it you'll get a selection of Material You color swatches that look like they were ripped right out of Android. There is still a white theme if you want to ignore all that, though the default color now seems to be back to blue instead of gray, just like the early versions of Chrome. As previously promised , the SSL lock icon in the address bar has been replaced by a settings switch. The "Down arrow" tab menu has been moved to the left side of the browser (on Windows, at least). All of the text and icon line work has been tweaked to be thicker, and some things, like the bookmark folders, have totally new icons.

    Everything has been rounded over. The top left and right corners of the toolbar are now rounded corners. The menu is rounded. The tab corners are even more rounded than they were before. And the Chrome window in the screenshots isn't even using the native OS UI—it's a totally custom window so that even the corners of the browser window can be rounded over. There isn't a single sharp edge on this thing.

    Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    • chevron_right

      Chrome will support the WebGPU API by default—here’s why that’s important

      news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Friday, 7 April, 2023 - 17:56

    Chrome will support the WebGPU API by default—here’s why that’s important

    Enlarge (credit: Andrew Cunningham/Google)

    Google announced today that it would enable WebGPU support in its Chrome browser by default starting in version 113, currently in beta. In development since 2017, WebGPU is a next-generation graphics API that aims to bring the benefits of low-overhead APIs like Microsoft's Direct3D 12, Apple's Metal, and Vulkan to web browsers and other apps.

    WebGPU support has been available but off by default in Chrome for a while now, because the API wasn't finalized and things could break from update to update. Google says that Mozilla and Apple will eventually support WebGPU in Firefox and Safari, and browsers like Microsoft Edge and Opera that rely on the Chromium browser engine can presumably choose to switch it on just as Google has.

    Chrome 113 supports WebGPU on Windows, macOS, and ChromeOS to start, with "support for other platforms" like Linux and Android "coming later this year." This browser version should roll out to all Chrome users sometime in May.

    Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    • chevron_right

      Chrome users have faced 3 security concerns over the past 24 hours

      Dan Goodin · news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Friday, 5 February, 2021 - 21:21

    Chrome users have faced 3 security concerns over the past 24 hours

    (credit: Chrome )

    Users of Google’s Chrome browser have faced three security concerns over the past 24 hours in the form of a malicious extension with more than 2 million users, a just-fixed zero-day, and new information about how malware can abuse Chrome's sync feature to bypass firewalls. Let’s discuss them one by one.

    First up, the Great Suspender, an extension with more than 2 million downloads from the Chrome Web Store, has been pulled from Google servers and deleted from users’ computers. The extension has been an almost essential tool for users with small amounts of RAM on their devices. Since Chrome tabs are known to consume large amounts of memory, the Great Suspender temporarily suspends tabs that haven’t been opened recently. That allows Chrome to run smoothly on systems with modest resources.

    Characteristically terse

    Google's official reason for the removal is characteristically terse. Messages displayed on devices that had the extension installed say only, “This extension contains malware” along with an indication that it has been removed. A Google spokesman declined to elaborate.

    Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    index?i=ooMPqnL1CuE:eWEW5oucaNA:V_sGLiPBpWUindex?i=ooMPqnL1CuE:eWEW5oucaNA:F7zBnMyn0Loindex?d=qj6IDK7rITsindex?d=yIl2AUoC8zA
    • chevron_right

      Malicious Chrome and Edge add-ons had a novel way to hide on 3 million devices

      Dan Goodin · news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Wednesday, 3 February, 2021 - 21:09

    Stylized illustration of Internet address bar.

    Enlarge (credit: Getty Images )

    In December, Ars reported that as many as 3 million people had been infected by Chrome and Edge browser extensions that stole personal data and redirected users to ad or phishing sites. Now, the researchers who discovered the scam have revealed the lengths the extension developers took to hide their nefarious deeds.

    As previously reported, the 28 extensions available in official Google and Microsoft repositories advertised themselves as a way to download pictures, videos, or other content from sites including Facebook, Instagram, Vimeo, and Spotify. Behind the scenes, they also collected user’s birth dates, email addresses, and device information and redirected clicks and search results to malicious sites. Google and Microsoft eventually removed the extensions.

    Researchers from Prague-based Avast said on Wednesday that the extension developers employed a novel way to hide malicious traffic sent between infected devices and the command and control servers they connected to. Specifically, the extensions funneled commands into the cache-control headers of traffic that was camouflaged to appear as data related to Google analytics, which websites use to measure visitor interactions.

    Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    index?i=6GL3cnMXHwc:kpeLGfhlKpo:V_sGLiPBpWUindex?i=6GL3cnMXHwc:kpeLGfhlKpo:F7zBnMyn0Loindex?d=qj6IDK7rITsindex?d=yIl2AUoC8zA
    • chevron_right

      Écriture inclusive : une extension pour navigateur facilite l’usage des points médians

      Nelly Lesage · news.movim.eu / Numerama · Friday, 29 January, 2021 - 10:33

    Un étudiant en informatique vient de créer l'extension « Ecriture Inclusive Facile ». Sur navigateur, elle facilite l'usage de l'écriture inclusive en modifiant les points « . » en points médians « · » lors de la saisie. [Lire la suite]

    Voitures, vélos, scooters... : la mobilité de demain se lit sur Vroom ! https://www.numerama.com/vroom/vroom//

    L'article Écriture inclusive : une extension pour navigateur facilite l’usage des points médians est apparu en premier sur Numerama .

    • chevron_right

      Chrome and Edge want to help with that password problem of yours

      Dan Goodin · news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Friday, 22 January, 2021 - 12:45

    Please don

    Enlarge / Please don't do this. (credit: Getty Images)

    If you’re like lots of people, someone has probably nagged you to use a password manager and you still haven’t heeded the advice. Now, Chrome and Edge are coming to the rescue with beefed-up password management built directly into the browsers.

    Microsoft on Thursday announced a new password generator for the recently released Edge 88. People can use the generator when signing up for a new account or when changing an existing password. The generator provides a drop-down in the password field. Clicking on the candidate selects it as a password and saves it to a password manager built into the browser. People can then have the password pushed to their other devices using the Edge password sync feature.

    As I’ve explained for years, the same things that make passwords memorable and easy to use are the same things that make them easy for others to guess. Password generators are among the safest sources of strong passwords. Rather than having to think up a password that’s truly unique and hard to guess, users can instead have a generator do it properly.

    Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    index?i=oaFhyrU68Gg:TKK_fJg6-o0:V_sGLiPBpWUindex?i=oaFhyrU68Gg:TKK_fJg6-o0:F7zBnMyn0Loindex?d=qj6IDK7rITsindex?d=yIl2AUoC8zA
    • chevron_right

      Up to 3 million devices infected by malware-laced Chrome and Edge add-ons

      Dan Goodin · news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Wednesday, 16 December, 2020 - 19:58

    Close up of address bar on internet browser

    Enlarge (credit: Getty Images )

    As many as 3 million people have been infected by Chrome and Edge browser extensions that steal personal data and redirect users to ad or phishing sites, a security firm said on Wednesday.

    In all, researchers from Prague-based Avast said they found 28 extensions for the Google Chrome and Microsoft Edge browsers that contained malware. The add-ons billed themselves as a way to download pictures, videos, or other content from sites including Facebook, Instagram, Vimeo, and Spotify. At the time this post went live, some, but not all, of the malicious extensions remained available for download from Google and Microsoft.

    Avast researchers found malicious code in the JavaScript-based extensions that allows them to download malware onto an infected computer. In a post , the researchers wrote:

    Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    index?i=Ea0KTjTnG0g:8fJgws-arEc:V_sGLiPBpWUindex?i=Ea0KTjTnG0g:8fJgws-arEc:F7zBnMyn0Loindex?d=qj6IDK7rITsindex?d=yIl2AUoC8zA