close
    • chevron_right

      Judge’s inaction in Trump classified documents case dashes July trial hopes

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Tuesday, 2 April - 10:00

    US judge Aileen Cannon’s delays in setting a schedule means prosecutors are unlikely to get their wish for a trial in July

    The prospects of Donald Trump going to trial in July on charges of retaining national security documents, as suggested by special counsel prosecutors, are rapidly diminishing, with the judge overseeing the case yet to issue a schedule weeks after she was presented with the potential options.

    The US district judge Aileen Cannon received proposed trial start dates from Trump and the special counsel Jack Smith more than a month ago in advance of a hearing ostensibly to settle the matter in Fort Pierce, Florida, but she has still not decided when the proceeding will begin.

    Continue reading...
    • chevron_right

      Trash from the International Space Station may have hit a house in Florida

      news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 2 April - 00:24

    This cylindrical object, a few inches in size, fell through the roof of Alejandro Otero's home in Florida last month.

    Enlarge / This cylindrical object, a few inches in size, fell through the roof of Alejandro Otero's home in Florida last month. (credit: Alejandro Otero on X )

    A few weeks ago, something from the heavens came crashing through the roof of Alejandro Otero's home, and NASA is on the case.

    In all likelihood, this nearly two-pound object came from the International Space Station. Otero said it tore through the roof and both floors of his two-story house in Naples, Florida.

    Otero wasn't home at the time, but his son was there. A Nest home security camera captured the sound of the crash at 2:34 pm local time (19:34 UTC) on March 8. That's an important piece of information because it is a close match for the time—2:29 pm EST (19:29 UTC)—that US Space Command recorded the reentry of a piece of space debris from the space station. At that time, the object was on a path over the Gulf of Mexico, heading toward southwest Florida.

    Read 34 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    • chevron_right

      Spinning, whirling fish in south Florida prompt emergency response

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Sunday, 31 March - 11:00

    Smalltooth sawfish are behaving oddly, eliciting a first-ever plan to rescue and rehabilitate species from wild

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is launching what the agency described as an emergency response effort in south Florida after emerging reports of smalltooth sawfish spinning, whirling and displaying other abnormal behaviors.

    In a statement released last Wednesday, NOAA said that in addition to the abnormal behaviors, there have been reports of fish deaths in the lower Florida Keys, including more than 28 smalltooth sawfish as of 24 March.

    Continue reading...
    • chevron_right

      DeSantis allies reach settlement over who controls Disney’s governing district

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Wednesday, 27 March - 18:36

    Tourism oversight board members approve agreement, ending nearly two years of litigation after DeSantis’s takeover

    Allies of Ron DeSantis reached a settlement agreement with Disney in a lawsuit over who controls Walt Disney World’s governing district, easing tensions between the entertainment giant and Florida’s governor.

    Lawyers for the state had sued Disney over “11th-hour deals” that members of the district board – all company-appointed at the time – had passed before they were replaced by DeSantis appointees.

    Continue reading...
    • chevron_right

      Pornhub prepared to block Florida if child safety law takes effect

      news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Wednesday, 27 March - 15:33

    Pornhub prepared to block Florida if child safety law takes effect

    Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson | Getty Images)

    This week, Florida made headlines after passing HB 3, a law banning children under 14 from accessing social media without parental consent.

    Much less attention was given to another requirement under the law obligating "pornographic or sexually explicit websites" to "use age verification to prevent minors from accessing sites that are inappropriate for children," as Republican Florida Governor Ron DeSantis explained the law in a statement .

    But Pornhub's parent company, Aylo, has taken notice, with a spokesperson confirming to Ars that "we are aware of the passage into law of HB 3 in Florida, which unfortunately fails to protect minors online."

    Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    • chevron_right

      Florida braces for lawsuits over law banning kids from social media

      news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 26 March - 16:31

    Florida braces for lawsuits over law banning kids from social media

    Enlarge (credit: Lisa5201 | E+ )

    On Monday, Florida became the first state to ban kids under 14 from social media without parental permission. It appears likely that the law—considered one of the most restrictive in the US—will face significant legal challenges, however, before taking effect on January 1.

    Under HB 3 , apps like Instagram, Snapchat, or TikTok would need to verify the ages of users, then delete any accounts for users under 14 when parental consent is not granted. Companies that "knowingly or recklessly" fail to block underage users risk fines of up to $10,000 in damages to anyone suing on behalf of child users. They could also be liable for up to $50,000 per violation in civil penalties.

    In a statement , Florida governor Ron DeSantis said the "landmark law" gives "parents a greater ability to protect their children" from a variety of social media harm. Florida House Speaker Paul Renner, who spearheaded the law, explained some of that harm, saying that passing HB 3 was critical because "the Internet has become a dark alley for our children where predators target them and dangerous social media leads to higher rates of depression, self-harm, and even suicide."

    Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    • chevron_right

      Florida man gets unexplained leprosy case; doctors suspect local soil

      news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 8 August, 2023 - 21:29 · 1 minute

    An armadillo prepares to cross a gravel road as the space shuttle Endeavour rests on the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center before the scheduled launch of STS-130 in Cape Canaveral, Florida, February 4, 2010.

    Enlarge / An armadillo prepares to cross a gravel road as the space shuttle Endeavour rests on the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center before the scheduled launch of STS-130 in Cape Canaveral, Florida, February 4, 2010. (credit: Getty | JIM WATSON )

    A Florida man's unexplained case of leprosy last year adds to mounting evidence that the rare and often misunderstood bacterial infection has become endemic to the central part of the Sunshine State—and that it may, in fact, lurk in the environment there, possibly in the soil.

    In a research letter appearing in the August issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases, three dermatologists detailed the man's case and their concerns for local transmission. They note that the 54-year-old man, like several others in the state who contracted the disease, reported no established risk factors that might explain their infection. He hadn't traveled abroad, where he could have picked up the infection, or had any exposure to armadillos, which live in Florida and naturally carry the bacteria that cause leprosy. He also didn't have any prolonged contact with people from leprosy-endemic countries or connections to anyone known to have leprosy.

    But he did spend a lot of time outdoors; he worked as a landscaper. In fact, many of the recent Florida cases lacked traditional risk factors but reported spending a lot of time outdoors. The similarity "supports the investigation into environmental reservoirs as a potential source of transmission," the doctors wrote.

    Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    • chevron_right

      Florida officials deleted data, stats from dubious COVID analysis: report

      news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Friday, 7 April, 2023 - 22:05

    Florida surgeon general Joseph Ladapo speaks at a press conference.

    Enlarge / Florida surgeon general Joseph Ladapo speaks at a press conference. (credit: Getty | Paul Hennessy )

    Florida health officials deleted key data and statistics from a state analysis on the safety of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines, falsely making them appear unsafe for young men, according to draft versions of the analysis obtained by the Tampa Bay Times through public records requests .

    The final analysis, which was widely criticized for its poor quality and dubious conclusions , was the basis for a statewide recommendation by Surgeon General Joseph Ladapo last October that young men, ages 18 to 39, should not receive an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine. The analysis—posted on the Florida Department of Health's website with no authors listed—claimed to find "an 84% increase in the relative incidence of cardiac-related death among males 18-39 years old within 28 days following mRNA vaccination."

    Ladapo, who has a history of fearmongering about COVID-19 vaccines , touted the analysis, saying in a press release at the time that "these are important findings that should be communicated to Floridians.”

    Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    • chevron_right

      Florida surgeon general wrong on vaccines and bad at his job, CDC and FDA say

      news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Monday, 13 March, 2023 - 20:23 · 1 minute

    Florida Surgeon General Joseph Ladapo speaks at a press conference in Rockledge, Florida, on August 3, 2022.

    Enlarge / Florida Surgeon General Joseph Ladapo speaks at a press conference in Rockledge, Florida, on August 3, 2022. (credit: Getty | SOPA Images )

    At the height of the pandemic, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis repeatedly promoted COVID-19 vaccines , saying correctly that "they're safe, they're effective," and they "are saving lives." With hundreds of millions of shots given worldwide at this point, the extensive international data on the vaccines' safety and efficacy have strongly and consistently backed DeSantis' statements. The vaccines are estimated to have saved over 14 million lives in 185 countries just in the pandemic's first two years .

    But amid growing rumors of a 2024 presidential bid, DeSantis reversed his stance on the life-saving shots, abruptly questioning their efficacy and making unfounded claims about their safety. In December, his about-face culminated in a call for a grand jury to investigate any alleged " crimes and wrongdoing " related to the vaccines.

    Though the swing appears more aimed at scoring political points than protecting Floridians' health, DeSantis' hand-picked surgeon general, Joseph Ladapo, has hewed closely to the governor's anti-vaccine rhetoric and health misinformation. Since his appointment as Florida's top doctor in late 2021, Ladapo has made false claims about vaccines, encouraged vaccine hesitancy, opposed masks, downplayed the health effects of COVID-19, and promoted ineffective COVID-19 treatments, such as ivermectin .

    Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments